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PROGRAM At-A-Glance

Day 1: Monday 13 June

Time (PDT)
Event
Location
7:30 – 8:00
Registration
Discovery Hall Lobby
8:00 – 16:00
Workshops
Discovery Hall (Registration Required)
17:30 – 19:00
Happy Hour
Iconic Brewing

Day 2: Tuesday 14 June

Time (PDT)
Event
Location
8:00
Registration Opens
Discovery Hall Lobby
8:30 – 9:00
Welcome Remarks
Discovery Hall Horizon
9:00 – 10:00
Plenary Speaker (Chairwoman Carol Evans)
Discovery Hall Horizon
10:00 – 10:30
Break (Light refreshments provided)
Discovery Hall Lobby
10:30 – 12:30
Concurrent Sessions
Discovery Hall
– Middle Columbia River
– Vista
– Fisheries Mgmt & Conservation in Africa
– Horizon A
– Watershed Approaches 1
– Horizon C
– Current Trends: Culverts
– Horizon D
12:30 – 13:45
Lunch (Catered)
Discovery Hall Lobby
13:45 – 15:45
Concurrent Sessions
Discovery Hall
– Hydropower MOU 1
– Vista
– Silver Bullet for Silver Eels 1
– Horizon A
– Watershed Approaches 2
– Horizon C
– Current Trends: Culverts 2
– Horizon D
15:45 – 16:15
Break (Light refreshments provided)
Discovery Hall Lobby
16:15 – 17:35
Concurrent Sessions
Discovery Hall
– Hydropower MOU 2; Panel Session + Town Hall
– Vista
– Silver Bullet for Silver Eels 2
– Horizon A
– Watershed Approaches 3
– Horizon C
– New & Emerging Tech 1
– Horizon D
17:30 – 19:00
Welcome Social and Poster Session (hors d’oeuvres provided)
Discovery Hall Lobby

Day 3: Wednesday 15 June

Time (PDT)
Event
Location
8:00
Registration Opens
Discovery Hall Lobby
8:30 – 8:45
Presentation of Career Achievement Award
Discovery Hall
8:45 – 9:45
Plenary Speaker (Dr. Gordon O’Brien)
Discovery Hall Horizon
9:45 – 10:15
Break (Light refreshments provided)
Discovery Hall Lobby
10:15 – 12:15
Concurrent Sessions
Discovery Hall
– When Fish Passage Didn’t Work as Intended 1
– Vista
– High Head & Diversion Dams 1
– Horizon A
– Hydropower & Fish 1
– Horizon C
– New & Emerging Tech 2
– Horizon D
12:15 – 13:30
Lunch (Catered)
Discovery Hall Lobby
13:30 – 15:10
Concurrent Sessions
Discovery Hall
– When Fish Passage Didn’t Work as Intended 2; Stats Methods 2
– Vista
– High Head & Diversion Dams 2
– Horizon A
– Hydropower & Fish 2
– Horizon C
– New & Emerging Tech 3
– Horizon D
15:10 – 15:40
Break (Light refreshments provided)
Discovery Hall Lobby
15:40 – 17:20
Concurrent Sessions
Discovery Hall
– Fish Passage for Diverse Audiences
– Vista
– Stats Methods 2
– Horizon A
– Hydropower & Fish 3
– Horizon C
– New & Emerging Tech 4
– Horizon D
18:00 – 21:00
Banquet (Dinner provided at 18:45)
Fable Craft Bar @ J. Bookwalter
*9:00 – 13:00
Badger Mountain Guided Hike
Departs from Discovery Hall (Registration Required)

Day 4: Thursday 16 June

Time (PDT)
Event
Location
8:00
Registration Opens
Discovery Hall Lobby
8:30 – 8:45
Presentation of Distinguished Project Award
Discovery Hall
8:45 – 9:45
Plenary Speaker (Dr. Evelyn Habit)
Discovery Hall Horizon
9:45 – 10:15
Break (Light refreshments provided)
Discovery Hall Lobby
10:15 – 12:15
Concurrent Sessions
Discovery Hall
– Cross Continental Fish Passage Research Network
– Vista
– High Head & Diversion Dams 3
– Horizon A
– Dam Decommissioning & Removal 1
– Horizon C
– Nature-Like Fishways
– Horizon D
12:15 – 13:30
Lunch (Catered)
Discovery Hall Lobby
13:30 – 15:10
Concurrent Sessions
Discovery Hall
– Fundamental Science
– Vista
– Biotelemetry 1
– Horizon A
– Dam Decommissioning & Removal 2
– Horizon C
– Nature-Like Fishways: Design 1
– Horizon D
15:10 – 15:40
Break (Light refreshments provided)
Discovery Hall Lobby
15:40 – 17:00
Concurrent Sessions
Discovery Hall
– Global Fish Passage Policies
– Vista
– Biotelemetry 2
– Horizon A
– Dam Decommissioning & Removal 3
– Horizon C
– Nature-Like Fishways: Design 2
– Horizon D

Day 5: Friday 17 June

Time (PDT)
Event
Location
8:00 – 17:00
Field Trips
Various (Registration Required)

Plenary Speakers

Session Date: Tuesday, June 14, 9:00-10:00 AM PDT

Session Title: The passage of fish, not time, heals wounds

Biography: Carol Evans is the Chairwoman of the Spokane Tribal Business Council and is the first woman to serve as Tribal Chair. Prior to being elected to the Spokane Tribal Council in 2013, she worked twenty-eight years as the Chief Financial Officer for The Spokane Tribe of Indians. Carol graduated from Eastern Washington University with a Bachelors of Arts Degree in Business Administration and retains a CPA Inactive Certificate from the State of Washington. 

On June 12, 2013, Carol took the oath of office for the Spokane Tribal Business Council. She is the second woman to be elected for a Tribal Council position and her mother, Pauline Stearns, was the first Tribal Council woman of her Tribe. Carol resides on the Spokane Indian Reservation along the banks of the Spokane River with her husband, Terry Evans, of forty-four years. They have four children ranging from ages forty-two to twenty-three. 

Carol truly believes that our spiritual tradition shows us the way to live in harmony and balance that includes a deep conviction to respect all things.  One must respect self, our earth, and each other. Each and every matter of creation has a purpose and one purpose is as important as another. Shay u hoy (that is all).

Session Date: Wednesday, June 15, 8:45-9:45 AM PDT

Session Title: Past, present, pollution, passage and a tigerfish named Piet: African fishes in peril?

Biography: Dr. Gordon O’Brien is a professional (Pri.Sci.Nat) scientist and rated researcher (C2) from the University of Mpumalanga and Rivers of Life Programme in South Africa. His career vision is to undertake evidence based research on water resources and their response to multiple stressors for a sustainable future. He has 18 years of experience in water resource management and protection, ecological risk assessments, aquatic ecology, Ichthyology and fisheries, environmental flow assessments and ecotoxicology. Gordon has worked in 16 African countries and collaborates with >10 international universities and institutes. Gordon has published numerous peer reviewed papers and book chapters in international journals.

Abstract: Africa hosts some of the world’s most biologically diverse water resources with possibly the greatest potential for the discovery of new species due to how isolated our resources are, and the limited taxonomic attention the continent receives. While the majority of the water resources on the continent are “under development” many have already been transformed through multiple anthropogenic stressors on a range of spatial scales from localised impacts to changes on basin scales.  Unfortunately, throughout the continent we are losing our biodiversity and the associated wellbeing of our ecosystems, including ecosystem function and the critical services our vulnerable human communities depend on. And, in Africa we have very limited human and financial resources to contribute to the sustainable development and management of our vulnerable resources. This is a wicked problem that needs to be solved.

This is where Piet comes in. Piet is one of our Iconic African Tigerfish that lives in the Sabie River in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. Piet is one of the stars of a research programme we are developing to characterise the biology, ecology and importantly migratory behaviour of African fishes. Throughout Africa we have been looking at fishes such as Piet, and been using their life cycles to contribute to the determination of the ecological requirements and sustainable development targets of some of our important water resources, and determine the socio-ecological consequences of multiple stressors affecting vulnerable water resources on the continent.  From the Great Fish River in South Africa to the Nile River in Egypt we have been involved in case studies across the continent in an attempt to contribute to the sustainable development of resources and protection of our biodiversity including fisheries resources.

In this paper I will review our African research including case studies on Inner Niger Delta, Sudd and Phongolo Floodplains, and the use of fish as indicators to evaluate the socio-ecological consequences of altered flows. I will describe how we have established and environmental flow (E-flow) determination method and applied it to establish e-flow requirements for the Nile, Mara and Limpopo River basins. I will present our work on the characterisation of and use of the biology and ecology of our Africa Anguillid eels (Anguilla spp.), yellowfish (Labeobarbus spp.), tigerfish (Hydrocynus spp.) and mullet to support river connectivity management and sustainable development of important biodiversity hotspot regions of southern Africa. And finally we’ll look at how we are starting to see the bigger picture of water resource development in Africa and what needs to be done post the 2030 Sustainable Development Goal agenda deadline which we will generally meet by default so that we can save our fishes and the people who need them.

Session Date: Thursday, June 16, 8:45-9:45 AM PDT

Session Title: How important is river connectivity for small-bodied, resident, non-game fish species?

Biography: Evelyn Habit is a fish biologist, Full Professor at the Faculty of Environmental Science of Universidad de Concepción in Chile. Her research focus is on freshwater fish ecology and management. She addresses questions related to human activities as drivers of the status of freshwater fish populations and communities, emphasizing the conservation of Chilean native species. She is interested in unravelling the effects of multiple stressors on riverine watersheds studying responses at different ecological levels and spatial and temporal scales. She is particularly interested in understanding the impacts of invasive species, flow regime alterations, physical connectivity changes and climate change in Andean and Patagonian river basins.

Symposia Sessions

Chairs: Daniel Deng, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Ted Castro-Santos, U.S. Geological Survey; Lee Baumgartner, Charles Sturt University

Biotelemetry has been identified as a primary technology to observe and assess the behavior and survival of various aquatic animals in both freshwater and marine environments. However, the size and/or performance of the existing transmitters and receivers limits their usefulness for studying certain fish types and sizes, introducing a potential bias to the study results. The proposed symposium will focus on recent technological advances of biotelemetry, applications for fish passage globally, and future outlook. The symposium will also encourage submissions on data standardization, protocols and perspective for equipment compatibility and data sharing from different vendors.

Chairs: Dana McCoskey, U.S. Dept. of Energy; Connie Svoboda, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Locke Williams, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 

The U.S. Department of Energy, the Department of the Interior through the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Department of the Army through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers signed a new Federal Hydropower Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in 2021 to enhance collaboration and leverage resources to meet the United States’ need for reliable and affordable hydropower. This MOU builds on previous work to strengthen long-term coordination, prioritize work in areas of mutual interest or with similar goals, and align ongoing and future research to support renewable energy development efforts. The MOU Agencies developed an Action Plan to provide the framework for collaborations and enhance technology research, development, and demonstration, with fish protection being one of the focus areas. MOU agency staff, researchers, and DOE funding recipients will share information on agency priorities for fish passage and protection R&D as well as relevant funding mechanisms, technical findings, and examples of how partnerships have advanced fish passage and protection goals.

Chairs: Daniel Zielinski, Great Lakes Fishery Commission; Ana T. Silva, Norwegian Institute for Nature Research

The Cross-Continental Fish Passage and Conservation Research Network (CONCERN) aims at strengthening an international collaboration of researchers from Norway, USA and Canada that work closely with both environmental conservation and hydropower industry and management. Commonalities in research facilities and untapped fish movement data across all three countries create opportunities for future collaborative work on fish migration and conservation. Complementary facilities and technology creates unique opportunity to develop cooperative research, facilitates exchange, and training of students developing similar research on fish conservation and river restoration. Work towards generalized analyses for fish movement data could provide insights on fish behavior and ecology, crucial scientific knowledge for the improvement of river management. CONCERN also identified the need for a merger between basic scientists, applied scientists, and engineers to translate laboratory understandings of cognition into engineered solutions for fish conservation and invasive species management. This symposium brings together scientists and engineers from all the three countries with extensive experience in fish passage and fish conservation research to share site-specific research goals, facility designs and capabilities, pitfalls/lessons learned, and avenues to add value to other (international) research questions.

Chair: Shane Scott, SSA Environmental LLC

Culverts and other conveyances are second only to dams in blocking passage of fish and other aquatic organisms. Culverts may impede passage to spawning grounds. These barriers also may adversely affect habitat connectivity for many species. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife estimates there are about 19,000 fish passage barriers in the state. About 84% of these barriers are culverts. This symposium will present information on the current knowledge of aquatic organism passage (AOP) through culverts. Presenters will discuss methods of identifying and characterizing the adverse effects of culverts on AOP. They will present information on potential mitigation measures. Case studies will be presented to demonstrate the array of potential mitigation measures. They will also discuss what can be done to rehabilitate a culvert when replacement is not practicable. Potential methods used to quantify the benefits of corrective actions will also be discussed.

Chairs: Michael Burke, Inter-Fluve; Martin Melchior, Inter-Fluve; Mackenzie Butler, Inter-Fluve

Dam decommissioning and dam removal are increasingly common management strategies motivated by a broad array of objectives that may include least-cost management of aging infrastructure, public safety, reduction of environmental hazard potential, and restoration of aquatic habitat and watershed connectivity, to name a few. Associated with pending infrastructure recovery funding and initiatives such as the Uncommon Dialogue, it is anticipated that dam removal will accelerate. Although no two projects are alike, future removals may be even more complex than the removals to date. A central thread throughout is restoration of aquatic organism passage and habitat connectivity to support life history needs. With looming impacts to habitat distribution in response to climate change, connectivity is essential to avoid species extirpation and loss of biodiversity. Contributions will represent all aspects of dam removal planning, design, implementation and monitoring. The goal for the session is a dialogue that blends practical research, asset development, and case studies nationwide to represent the state of the practice. Invited speakers are intended to represent key research and guideline developments, and novel case studies. In addition to habitat connectivity, rich discussions of sediment management analysis and planning, risk identification and management, regulatory policy, and other related topics are welcomed.

Chairs: Tim Brush, Inter-Fluve; Mike Burke, Inter-Fluve; Mackenzie Butler, Inter-Fluve

Over the past 25 years or so, nature-like fishways (NLF) have been employed increasingly as an alternative to conventional technical fishways. There may be multiple reasons for selecting one class of fishway over the other, such as the space and other aspects of the environs where the fishway will be installed; hydrology and hydraulics of the river; species and life stages of interest; expected performance; aesthetics; and cost. This symposium will delve into the geography of installed NLF, design considerations given the location and appurtenant factors, construction challenges and lessons learned, and biological effectiveness of the fishways. We will feature presentations that: explore the viability of balancing NLF with facility operation at existing hydroelectric projects, describe difficult design or construction issues and how they were addressed, make recommendations for future NLF applications, and report performance results (structural/hydraulic and biological). Case studies as well as reviews and syntheses of data will be welcomed. A moderated interactive discussion period will be incorporated into the symposium schedule.

Chair: Toby Kock, U.S. Geological Survey

High head dams and diversion dams have been constructed on many highly managed rivers to provide societal benefits including flood-control, hydropower, and water for irrigation. In these systems, resource managers tasked with restoring migratory fish populations are faced with developing effective passage solutions at these two dam types, each of which create unique fish passage challenges. In recent years, novel fish passage devices have been developed to provide fish passage at high head dams and substantial efforts are underway to improve fish exclusion capabilities at diversion dams. Additionally, systems are being developed to collect downstream migrants at the head of large storage reservoirs to prevent fish from experiencing delays and mortality in reservoirs and at high head dams. This session will include presentations that provide new information about fish passage and survival, innovative passage developments, and critical uncertainties related to improving fish passage in rivers impounded by high head and diversion dams.

Chair: Alison Colotelo, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

This symposia will focus on some workforce development, STEM education, communications, and recognition of technical feats regarding fish passage for a broader audience.

Chair: TBD

Chairs: Luiz G. M. Silva, ETH-Zurich; Christopher Henderson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Effective policy and legislation are paramount for the protection of riverine fisheries and freshwater ecosystem health. Fish passages have been identified in most policies and regulations globally as the main tool to restore migratory pathways around barriers. Global agreements (e.g., Convention on Biological Biodiversity) as well as international, national, and regional legislation exist in different geographic and political contexts to protect freshwater resources, particularly migratory fish. Despite these efforts, however, migratory fish populations are still declining rapidly. It is clear that the existence of legislation does not imply achievement of its expected outcomes, yet a comprehensive understanding of the misalignment between policy implementation and accomplishing it’s stated goals remains elusive. Many factors (e.g., governance regimes, lack of enforcement, inadequate social support and acceptance, etc.) may hinder the success of a policy or lead to unanticipated outcomes. In this symposium we aim to convene a global assembly of scientists, engineers, legislators, and practitioners from different continents to present their perspectives and chart new ideas for innovative fish passage strategies. Identifying these key factors and co-creating pathways for adapting and developing new legislation are key tasks to improve effectiveness of legal measures to protect fish.

Chairs: Marcell Szabo-Meszaros, SINTEF Energy Research; Daniel Deng, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory


Beyond its apparent contribution to the modern civilization hydropower industry always challenged native ecosystems. In order to address them efficiently it is important to raise awareness on such problems. With this objective numerous working programmes and projects aim to increase common understanding on the effect of hydropower on fish in the first place while mitigation measures are also tested and evaluated. Through different perspectives and scales the Hydropower & Fish symposia aims to present impacts of hydropower on fish such as two-way migration, changed habitat conditions, sedimentation, water quality or flow regime along with options on how to deal with them. Topic submissions are welcome from both case-specific as well as from general levels which target either single or comprehensive impacts of hydropower on fish.

 

Chairs: Céline Hanzen, University of KwaZulu-Natal; Matthew Burnett, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Africa’s inland waters hold a wide variety of freshwater habitats across biogeographic regions, from ephemeral streams and large rivers to shallow and deep lakes including vast floodplains and wetlands. Over 3500 freshwater fish occur in these habitats which contributes to the water and food security of millions of African people every day, with inland fisheries considered the second largest globally. Despite their importance, African waters and their fish are under threat from habitat change, water abstraction, fragmentation, overexploitation, and pollution to meet developing demands. Loss of connectivity and altered flow regimes inhibits the functionality of river systems. With proposals for more dam construction in Africa, a freshwater biodiversity crisis is looming. There is a need to improve on the knowledge of freshwater fishes for sustainable management and governance of African inland waters. This is especially true for ecological requirements such as fish passage and migrations. With technologies becoming more readily accessible on the continent, technological solutions are emerging to help with the management and conservation of African fish and their habitats. However, these are costly and overlooked. Here, we aim to highlight innovations and technologies from Africa, for the benefit of fish, their habitats, and people.

Chair: Jesse Waldrip, Kleinschmidt Associates

In many rivers along the east coast of the North America and throughout Europe, downstream migrating eels must pass over, around, or through dam structures—including hydroelectric turbines—that interrupt their path back to the ocean to spawn. Due to a variety of natural and anthropogenic factors, American Eel and European Eel population numbers are down. Providing mature eels (silver eels) with safe and effective downstream passage increases the chances the eels will reach their breeding grounds and sustain populations. There are so many variables involved in downstream eel passage planning, design, and implementation that finding a “silver bullet,” a “one-size-fits-all” solution to safe downstream passage has proven elusive despite many years of research and testing. This symposium is intended to provide an overview of the current practices, policies, and guidelines being implemented and to showcase the current state of the art and potential future methods and technologies for safely passing downstream migrating eels around dams and hydroelectric stations. The symposium will provide a venue for hydroelectric project owners, resource agencies, researchers, consultants, and other stakeholders to present and discuss their experiences, research, studies, and findings.

Chairs: Bill Sharp, Yakama Nation Fisheries; Josh Epstein, Inter-Fluve

Stretching from the Yakima River to Bonneville Dam, the middle Columbia River is a critically important corridor for fish use and migration. This 190-mile reach forms the heart of the Columbia River hydrosystem, and is comprised of a series of dams and reservoirs with significant impacts on fish survival. While there has been a tremendous amount of attention given to fish passage at the dams, mainstem habitat itself has been relatively overlooked, instead focusing on how to move fish up and downstream as swiftly as possible. Nevertheless, some species make extensive use of mainstem habitats and rely on them for survival; recent temperature-related fish kills have made this readily apparent. Tributary confluences are an important part of the solution. Confluences have the potential to provide feeding and resting areas during migration and much-needed cold-water refuge during warm periods. However, confluences are impacted by flow ramping, reduced passage across shallow sediments, loss of forested islands, and blockage of fish access by transportation infrastructure. The Yakama Nation and their partners have been involved in recent years with assessment and restoration of tributary delta habitats. This session will share the latest topics, research, and restoration actions associated with tributary confluences in the mid-Columbia.

Chair: Randy Beckwith

The Nature-Like Fishways (NLF) Symposium will address planning, design, construction, and monitoring. Many innovative approaches to NLF design have been developed that have expanded NLF use in recent years. The goal of the symposium is to present current NLF design practices to aid the practitioner in the implementation of these types of fishways. The symposium focus will be divided into two areas: (1) Best Design Practices and (2) Pushing the Design Envelope. Best Design Practices will be the focus of morning and early afternoon sessions. Presentations will cover: NLF siting, design parameters, flow complexity and turbulence, construction practices, seepage and interstitial flow, performance and stability risks, and monitoring and evaluation. Pushing the Design Envelope will present case studies and research that expands the typical design base of Nature-Like fishways. Presentations will cover: NLF designs, flow complexity and turbulence, large wood use, high roughness channels, stability and grouting, performance history, and balancing passage goals and costs.

Chair: Lucas Stiles, Kleinschmidt Associates

Providing fish passage at dams is a problem that engineers and scientists have been working to solve for generations. Over the years this has resulted in research and development of new technologies that have improved the way fish are passed. This symposium will provide a venue for engineers and scientists to present on new research, technologies, and innovations that will further advance the way fish are passed at dams. Potential topics could include palisade entrance design for upstream passage, v-trap configurations for upstream fish lifts and fish traps, advances in upstream eel passage substrates, Klawa zig-zag low flow downstream eel bypass system, vertical low flow downstream eel bypass system, Conte airlift bypass system, Whoosh Innovations, downstream eel guidance technologies, downstream passage systems at high head dams, and advances in tagging and monitoring equipment.

Chairs: Russell Perry, U.S. Geological Survey; Dalton Hance, U.S. Geological Survey; James Faulkner, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Resource managers have invested significant capital in fish passage infrastructure including technological innovations to monitor and evaluate fish passage. Examples of such innovations include smaller, more powerful, and longer lasting active telemetry tags, advances in PIT tag technology allowing deployment of stationary gate readers in fast flowing water, and databases that track the release and detection of millions of tagged fish within and among watersheds and over an individual’s entire life-cycle. These innovations not only allow us to evaluate fish passage itself (e.g., passage success, delay, route selection), but to understand the consequences of fish passage on survival and population dynamics. However, no data set – no matter the size, detail, complexity, or expense – speaks for itself. Advances in modern statistical methods are required to improve our understanding about fish passage and to quantify effects of passage on an individual’s subsequent behavior, survival, and life-cycle performance. In this symposium, we highlight recent advances in quantitative methods for evaluating fish passage and linking the effects of fish passage on survival, abundance, and other key demographic parameters for fish species migrating through regulated rivers. Applied analyses utilizing modern statistical methods and tools will also be featured.

Chairs: Melanie Gange, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Michael Bailey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Physical barriers to fish passage are ubiquitous throughout the United States and with over 90,000 dams and many more culverts, actions to tackle fish passage on a more comprehensive scale are necessary. Existing frameworks have different names – source to sea, basin-wide planning, watershed management – but share the goal of taking a watershed-wide approach to managing rivers for fish passage. Watershed approaches are intuitive strategies to address fish passage throughout a river basin, however challenges to this approach such as lack of resources, stakeholder engagement, and spatial and temporal complexity in management make it difficult to implement. This symposium explores case studies from previous watershed approaches to fish passage, ongoing watershed approaches, and future opportunities. Presenters will highlight challenges, successful strategies, prioritization tools, and opportunities for collaboration . This symposium is co-hosted by two agencies implementing provisions of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, and the timing of this conference is ripe for funders and project managers to foster collaboration, and generate new opportunities.

Chairs: Lisiane Hahn, Neotropical Environmental Consulting; Luiz G. M. Silva, ETZ Zurich

The blockage of fish migratory routes by barriers has historically contribute to the decline of migratory fish populations globally. Over the past 200 years, fish passage structures or fishways have been constructed as a tool to restore upstream connectivity in affected river reaches but became popular in tropical and subtropical river basins in early 2000. Despite being an established tool to promote upstream movements of migratory species in the Northern Hemisphere, the efficiency of fishways is still controversial for tropical fish. In some instances, it has been deemed to be deleterious for fish populations, failing to promote migratory fish conservation. In general, scientific publications are focused on successful case studies, and data about failures are very often restricted to technical reports with limited access. Given the expected growth of the hydropower sector towards megadiverse hotspots in the tropics, it becomes imperative to share and discuss experiences, problems, and solutions so that new fishway designs can become more effective. The objective of this symposium is to approach this need by presenting and discussing multiple cases of fishways in tropical regions, share the lessons learned by researchers, managers, and stakeholders and co-create future perspectives.